Photo of Inglenook Community School in Toronto, Black History Month

How the Underground Railroad Succeeded Thanks to Lack of Immigration Law

The Underground Railroad is often in the spotlight during Black History Month, but there is one little-discussed aspect that allowed the railroad to function and enabled Thornton Blackburn, his wife Lucie, and many other Black slaves to seek refuge in Canada: the fact that the country did not have a formal immigration law until 1869.

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Accents Celebrated at Shakespeare Reading

Four hundred years ago, on April, 23, 1616, William Shakespeare passed away. His plays are so special that today we can critically reflect on any topic when reading, staging, or watching them: social inequality, politics,…

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Freedom School: Educating Youth on Black Liberation

A campaign to collect books and other resources to enhance educational opportunities for black children in Toronto is gaining support, while the Black Lives Matter Toronto continues to challenge anti-Black racism in the city. A book drive took…

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Why Quebec—and Canada—Needs More Black Voices in Media

Blacks make up Montreal’s largest visible minority. According to the 2011 census, 147,100 live in the city. Why, then, are there so few in our media? As far back as the 1930s, black journalists in…

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MLK Would Be Proud of Canada: Grégoire-Trudeau

To some people, Canada seems like the land of American civil rights hero Martin Luther King Jr.’s dreams. But a group of race relations activists in Ottawa contend that this belies the truth, and that…

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