Tuesday, 01 November 2016 14:26

Bramptonians Sucking on a Lollipop

Commentary by Surjit Singh Flora in Brampton

A few weeks before Brampton Council begin debate on the latest budget, the city and province delivered a big lollipop to the citizens of Brampton in the form of a University to be built in our city.

At the risk of sounding cynical, I can’t help but suspect this little bit of theatre is meant to divert the attention of Bramptonians away from the poor economic performance of our city, the recent tax increases, stagnant municipal services, and the provinces’ ruinously expensive and incompetently handled hydro mismanagement.

Now, don’t get me wrong, I, like many, believe a university campus is something Brampton needs, and needs badly. In fact, I know many parents are excited at the thought of their children obtaining a quality post-secondary education in their own city.

Downloading to taxpayers

But for anyone who listened to what was said at the Brampton press event, while Brampton has been chosen as the site of one of two new university campuses, there was no specific timeline or details about where or when this facility will be built, how it will be funded, or how much of the cost the province will download onto the backs of Brampton taxpayers in order to make the announcement a reality.  

What we do know is that there is a $90 million allotment for each of the two municipalities approved in this round of funding. Let’s remember that when then Premier Dalton McGuinty wrote his infamous letter to the Brampton citizens promising that Peel Memorial Hospital would not be closed – just before he closed it − the replacement facility’s phase I costs were over $300 million and Bramptonians were practically extorted into paying $60 million towards the project.  

If you think this is an isolated occurrence, think again.  When the province promised to finish highway 410 north to highway 10, it was only accomplished after the Region of Peel was forced to pony up over $40 million to the province.  

Citizens in the dark

Will $90 million build a university campus?  I highly doubt it.  I am convinced we are going to be put in the position of shelling out millions more from municipal coffers – your tax money – to provide land and capital funding in order to make this happen. How sweet does that lollipop taste now?

Let’s face it, we have no idea what we are getting out of this latest deal.  We know from the past the province promised to keep our original hospital open, then closed it, then tore it down.  The slogan for the new Peel Memorial was “More than a Hospital,” but in fact this too was a lie.  The new Peel Memorial will be much less than a hospital.  It will house outpatient services, clinics, dialysis, and will not have an emergency department.  Instead, it will have an urgent care centre that closes down at night, and while some services now housed at Brampton Civic are moving to the new building, Brampton is getting much less than it deserves in terms of health care services.  This does not bode well for our university.

Brampton Councillor Gurpreet Dhillon says this council worked hard work to make this university happen and Mayor Linda Jeffery maintains this is exciting news for Bramptonians. This from a council that turned down $300 million in funding for a light rail line up Main Street that over 70 per cent of the citizens wanted.  

I think the citizens of Brampton have some fundamental issues with trusting this council and these concerns are well justified.   

So, I think we can all look forward to a future that will see more tax levies for health care, our university, and whatever other lollipop the city or province thinks up to throw at Brampton, in an attempt to win our votes with our own money. That makes us all a bunch of suckers.  

Brampton-based Surjit Singh Flora is a veteran journalist and freelance writer. 

Published in Education
Tuesday, 30 September 2014 13:28

Diversity Charter Takes Root in Peel Region

by Amrita Kumar-Ratta (@i_amrita_)

Peel Region has always been my home. Born in Waterloo, I moved to the City of Brampton with my mother and younger sister when I was seven years old and have collected all of my childhood memories here. A few years later, my father moved to Mississauga and my mother began working in Malton. A couple of years after that, I went to high school in Caledon. Throughout my various experiences in Peel’s three cities - and despite the fact that I am now a Torontonian - I have proudly represented my upbringing as a South Asian Canadian woman from what I consider to be an incredibly diverse Peel Region.

At the same time, I have been shaped immensely by countless instances of – sometimes inadvertent, though always harmful -- discrimination and inequity that I have experienced while growing up here. This includes feeling isolated due to my friendships with people of different ethnicities, being stonewalled in my attempts to challenge instances of institutional racism, and regularly feeling that I would have no future in the performing arts because of my skin colour and my ethnocultural background.

Why do I bring this all up? Well, because a month-and-a-half ago, I became the Project Lead for the second phase of a regional initiative, the Diversity and Inclusion Charter of Peel, developed by the Regional Diversity Roundtable (RDR), to try and correct precisely the kind of experiences I went through growing up.

[quote align="center" color="#999999"][...] the Diversity and Inclusion Charter of Peel is the first municipal-level initiative of its kind in Canada.[/quote]

When the opportunity to participate in the Charter Initiative at RDR, I felt an amazing feeling come over me: This was my opportunity to dynamically contribute to i) enhancing my home region’s existing diversity and prosperity; and to ii) taking concerted action towards social justice in the region by working towards tangible diversity, equity and inclusion with a number of committed individuals and organizations."

Having said all of this, what is it about the Peel Region that fuelled the creation of the Diversity and Inclusion Charter, and what does the Charter entail?

Setting the Stage: Peel Region

The Regional Municipality of Peel is comprised of the City of Brampton, the City of Mississauga and the Town of Caledon. The Region serves 1.3 million residents and approximately 88,000 businesses (2014); it is effectively the second largest municipality in Ontario after Toronto. In fact, the Region has also been hailed as one of the most diverse, fast growing and rapidly changing regions in Canada: 56.8% of its population identifies as visible minority; and it is home to more than 90 languages, the top of which include Punjabi, Urdu, Italian, Tagalog, Tamil and Arabic (2011 Census).

Additionally, in the 2007 Ontario Sustainability Report, Peel Region was ranked sixth overall, among 27 Ontario municipalities, measured on indicators of economic vitality, liveability and smart growth.

 

These statistics all point to the growing vitality of the Peel Region – owing to its diverse demography and its growing economy. However, as I described earlier, there is of course much more to the picture.

For starters, youth unemployment in the region is currently at 20%; nearly 40% of all Peel seniors are living in poverty; and the income gap between Peel males and females 15 years of age and older continues to persist. Additionally, despite the growing number of Aboriginal peoples in Peel (the 2011 Census reported 12,585 individuals with Aboriginal ancestry) (Statistics Canada), the community continues to experience much higher levels of poverty, poor health and substance abuse than Non-Aboriginal residents (Centre for Social Justice). Compounded to all of this is persistent ethnic, racial and religious discrimination. For instance, recent studies have pointed out that newcomers in the Peel Region experience much lower social mobility “comparable to their human capital investment” (Reitz, 2010). While 44% of recent immigrants aged 15 years and older in the Region have a university education, 33% live in poverty. Social exclusion on the basis of ethnicity, race, religion and citizenship status is thus at an all-time high in Peel (Galabuzi and Teelucksingh, 2010). 

Diversity & Inclusion Charter of Peel:  A Game-Changer

 It is this complex context that has given rise to the Diversity and Inclusion Charter of Peel – and it is this context that makes the Charter beneficial to the creation of an equitable, socially just and sustainable region that is unified in its vision for the future.

[quote align="center" color="#999999"]Social change may be a slow process, but once communities are able to speak out freely against injustice, and once organizations are able to live equity through their practices, it will happen.[/quote]

Developed by RDR in collaboration with the Peel Newcomer Strategy Group beginning in 2011; and officially launched in Mississauga on April 18, 2013, the Charter is described as a living document that complements – at a grassroots level – national and provincial legislation, including, among others, the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms, the Canadian Multiculturalism Act, the Ontario Human Rights Code, and the Accessibility of Ontarians with Disabilities Act.  Developed in part as a continued reflection of the Racism in Peel Series developed by the United Way of Peel Region in partnership with The Mississauga News and the Brampton Guardian; and in response to cases such as the Anti-Immigrant Flyers that have surfaced twice in 2014, the Charter is, in effect, the Peel’s very own ‘Community Code’. If successfully implemented, it will allow individuals and organizations across the Region – regardless of their stage in the journey towards diversity, equity and inclusion - to take greater advantage of Peel’s diversity and change while conscientiously acting to make sure that everyone feels included and has an equal opportunity to succeed.

While there have been a handful of such Charters spanning the U.K. and Europe (including France, Italy, Sweden, Luxembourg and Austria, among others – see www.diversity-charter.com), the Diversity and Inclusion Charter of Peel is the first municipal-level initiative of its kind in Canada.  As such, it is certainly something that has the potential to inspire, unify and transform other communities Canada-wide, particularly those that are currently experiencing increases in immigration in addition to other demographic, socioeconomic and cultural shifts.  Social change may be a slow process, but once communities are able to speak out freely against injustice, and once organizations are able to live equity through their practices, it will happen. The Diversity and Inclusion Charter of Peel is a small step towards creating a more responsible and self-reflexive society.

For more information and to endorse the Charter, please visit our website or our Facebook Page here


Amrita Kumar-Ratta has a Master’s in Global Affairs from the Munk School at the University of Toronto. She also holds a BA (Hon.) in International Development Studies and World Religions from McGill University. She is passionate about issues of transnational migration, religio-cultural diversity and gender equity. She can be reached at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

{module NCM Blurb}

Published in Top Stories
Sunday, 09 February 2014 15:17

Tamils emerge from the shadows

by Toronto Editor Ranjit Bhaskar
 
If an immigrant community’s coming-of-age needs to be gauged in Canada, the way it is courted by politicians is a good indicator. Leaders of all hues, from the federal to the municipal level, put on an unabashed display last month at the Canadian Tamil Congress (CTC) gala held in the Greater Toronto Area (GTA) city of Markham to celebrate Pongal, the Tamil equivalent of Thanksgiving Day.
 
Those present to woo the 300,000-strong community concentrated mostly in the GTA included Ontario Premier Kathleen Wynne, federal Citizenship and Immigration Minister Chris Alexander, Ontario PC and Official Opposition Leader Tim Hudak, and Markham Mayor Frank Scarpitti.  The pride of place at the event, however, went to Liberal leader Justin Trudeau. Heralded as the “future prime minister,” the gathering gave him a standing ovation. Seemingly carried away by the adulation, Mr Trudeau briefly showed off his Bollywood dance moves and regretted not coming dressed in a traditional South Asian outfit.
 
“Thirty years ago, there were a handful of Tamils in Canada, but today this country is home to tens of thousands of them who have established themselves with their values of hard work and determination,” he said. “These are not Tamil values; these are Canadian values,’’ he said amid rounds of applause.
 
Seeking international investigations into human rights violations by Sri Lanka in the last phases of the ethnic war in 2009, the Liberal leader said Canada would stand by the Tamil community in seeking justice on global platforms, including the UN Human Rights Council session in Geneva next month. This sentiment was echoed by Mr Alexander, who said “Canada will be at the forefront to ensure that accountability comes.”
 
Both the federal politicians were on cue as the session in Geneva is of huge importance to the community. The Canadian Tamil Congress, as part of its advocacy work, will be sending a delegation to Geneva and wants the UN to take decisive action against the Sri Lankan government for violating human rights.
 
Poll calculations
 
While Ms. Wynne said the strides made by the Tamils are “a great Canadian story,” Mr. Alexander said the community has been “a huge success for the Canada’s immigration program.”  That’s a big shift in stance by the Conservative Party, which has been trying hard to undo the harm done by its anti-Tamil rhetoric during the 2011 federal election after two ship loads of asylum seekers from Sri Lanka came ashore on the B.C. coast. Canada’s recent boycott of the Commonwealth summit hosted by Colombo was seen by many as an attempt by the ruling party to curry favour with the Tamils.  
 
Its need to garner support of the community along with that of other immigrant groups in the GTA has grown in importance as the 2015 election nears. The area, dubbed as the “905” after the telephone code that sets it apart from Toronto city, is expected to be a major battleground for votes.  The 905 is believed to have helped the Conservatives form a majority government despite the party doing badly in Québec. Significantly, both the Liberals and the New Democratic Party (NDP) have also stepped up their efforts in the area.
 
[quote align="center" color="#999999"]A recent opinion poll has suggested that the going will not be easy for the eight Conservative MPs from the area if an election were held right now. The poll, conducted by Mainstreet Technologies and released exclusively to iPolitics, said three could lose their seats and the five others could find themselves in tough battles.[/quote]
 
“It’s not surprising that given the national popularity of Justin Trudeau and the Liberal Party currently that these numbers are showing this, that there is a Liberal resurgence for sure,” Quito Maggi, president of Mainstreet Technologies, was quoted as saying. “On the other side, it doesn’t show a complete Conservative collapse as well. The Conservative base is alive and well in Peel region [consisting of Brampton and Mississauga].”
 
Tamil Heritage Month
 
At the CTC gala, almost all the leaders competed to promote Tamil culture. Mr. Hudak said he would be reintroducing a bill in the Ontario legislature to declare January as Tamil Heritage Month. Rathika Sitsabaiesan, the NDP MP for Scarborough—Rouge River riding, said she would be pressing ahead with her private bill, C-471, to designate the month as such across Canada. She said this month is celebrated throughout the country by Canadians of Tamil heritage, “as we recognize the cultural, political and economic contributions of Tamil Canadians in our communities.”
 
Ms Sitsabaiesan made no mention of her alleged intimidation by Sri Lankan authorities during her recent visit to the island. Her fellow NDP MP from the Toronto area, Prof. Craig Scott, was honoured with the “Leaders for Change” award at the event for his role as the founding member of the Sri Lanka Campaign for Peace and Justice.
 
 
Apart from this gesture, the Tamil community has been trying hard to reach out to the mainstream. As in the past four years, the CTC once again raised money through its annual walk-a-thon for a Canadian charity. With the cheque for $65,000 presented to the Holland Bloorview Kids Rehabilitation Hospital Foundation, the organization has raised over a quarter-million dollars for five charities in the past five years. Only time will tell whether this is yet another sign of an immigrant group emerging from the shadows to gain the “good immigrants” moniker as suggested by Premier Wynne and Minister Alexander or a cynical attempt to gain political clout.
 
{module NCM Blurb}
Published in South Asia
Sunday, 09 February 2014 03:50

Tamils emerge from the shadows

by Toronto Editor Ranjit Bhaskar
 
If an immigrant community’s coming-of-age needs to be gauged in Canada, the way it is courted by politicians is a good indicator. Leaders of all hues, from the federal to the municipal level, put on an unabashed display last month at the Canadian Tamil Congress (CTC) gala held in the Greater Toronto Area (GTA) city of Markham to celebrate Pongal, the Tamil equivalent of Thanksgiving Day.
 
Those present to woo the 300,000-strong community concentrated mostly in the GTA included Ontario Premier Kathleen Wynne, federal Citizenship and Immigration Minister Chris Alexander, Ontario PC and Official Opposition Leader Tim Hudak, and Markham Mayor Frank Scarpitti.  The pride of place at the event, however, went to Liberal leader Justin Trudeau. Heralded as the “future prime minister,” the gathering gave him a standing ovation. Seemingly carried away by the adulation, Mr Trudeau briefly showed off his Bollywood dance moves and regretted not coming dressed in a traditional South Asian outfit.
 
“Thirty years ago, there were a handful of Tamils in Canada, but today this country is home to tens of thousands of them who have established themselves with their values of hard work and determination,” he said. “These are not Tamil values; these are Canadian values,’’ he said amid rounds of applause.
 
Seeking international investigations into human rights violations by Sri Lanka in the last phases of the ethnic war in 2009, the Liberal leader said Canada would stand by the Tamil community in seeking justice on global platforms, including the UN Human Rights Council session in Geneva next month. This sentiment was echoed by Mr Alexander, who said “Canada will be at the forefront to ensure that accountability comes.”
 
Both the federal politicians were on cue as the session in Geneva is of huge importance to the community. The Canadian Tamil Congress, as part of its advocacy work, will be sending a delegation to Geneva and wants the UN to take decisive action against the Sri Lankan government for violating human rights.
 
Poll calculations
 
While Ms. Wynne said the strides made by the Tamils are “a great Canadian story,” Mr. Alexander said the community has been “a huge success for the Canada’s immigration program.”  That’s a big shift in stance by the Conservative Party, which has been trying hard to undo the harm done by its anti-Tamil rhetoric during the 2011 federal election after two ship loads of asylum seekers from Sri Lanka came ashore on the B.C. coast. Canada’s recent boycott of the Commonwealth summit hosted by Colombo was seen by many as an attempt by the ruling party to curry favour with the Tamils.  
 
Its need to garner support of the community along with that of other immigrant groups in the GTA has grown in importance as the 2015 election nears. The area, dubbed as the “905” after the telephone code that sets it apart from Toronto city, is expected to be a major battleground for votes.  The 905 is believed to have helped the Conservatives form a majority government despite the party doing badly in Québec. Significantly, both the Liberals and the New Democratic Party (NDP) have also stepped up their efforts in the area.
 
[quote align="center" color="#999999"]A recent opinion poll has suggested that the going will not be easy for the eight Conservative MPs from the area if an election were held right now. The poll, conducted by Mainstreet Technologies and released exclusively to iPolitics, said three could lose their seats and the five others could find themselves in tough battles.[/quote]
 
“It’s not surprising that given the national popularity of Justin Trudeau and the Liberal Party currently that these numbers are showing this, that there is a Liberal resurgence for sure,” Quito Maggi, president of Mainstreet Technologies, was quoted as saying. “On the other side, it doesn’t show a complete Conservative collapse as well. The Conservative base is alive and well in Peel region [consisting of Brampton and Mississauga].”
 
Tamil Heritage Month
 
At the CTC gala, almost all the leaders competed to promote Tamil culture. Mr. Hudak said he would be reintroducing a bill in the Ontario legislature to declare January as Tamil Heritage Month. Rathika Sitsabaiesan, the NDP MP for Scarborough—Rouge River riding, said she would be pressing ahead with her private bill, C-471, to designate the month as such across Canada. She said this month is celebrated throughout the country by Canadians of Tamil heritage, “as we recognize the cultural, political and economic contributions of Tamil Canadians in our communities.”
 
Ms Sitsabaiesan made no mention of her alleged intimidation by Sri Lankan authorities during her recent visit to the island. Her fellow NDP MP from the Toronto area, Prof. Craig Scott, was honoured with the “Leaders for Change” award at the event for his role as the founding member of the Sri Lanka Campaign for Peace and Justice.
 
 
Apart from this gesture, the Tamil community has been trying hard to reach out to the mainstream. As in the past four years, the CTC once again raised money through its annual walk-a-thon for a Canadian charity. With the cheque for $65,000 presented to the Holland Bloorview Kids Rehabilitation Hospital Foundation, the organization has raised over a quarter-million dollars for five charities in the past five years. Only time will tell whether this is yet another sign of an immigrant group emerging from the shadows to gain the “good immigrants” moniker as suggested by Premier Wynne and Minister Alexander or a cynical attempt to gain political clout.
 
{module NCM Blurb}
Published in Top Stories

by Ranjit Bhaskar

Maria, a 38-year-old single mother of two boys, aged 14 and 8, graduated from university in the Philippines and did well as a dental hygienist there. The family recently immigrated to Canada and settled in Toronto’s Scarborough area. Maria needs to re-train as a hygienist as her credentials are not recognized in Canada. Having spent all her savings on tuition, she is forced to make regular visits to a food bank to keep hunger at bay.
 
Like Maria, Ali and Sabrina from the Middle East are not your stereotypical users of food banks. Newcomers living in the Peel region of the Greater Toronto Area (GTA), the couple first visited the food bank not for food but to look for jobs in the community centre where it is located. Both have Masters Degrees from their home country, Ali in Biochemistry and Sabrina in Agronomy. Fluent in English, they are volunteering to get Canadian work experience. Sabrina says the effect of hunger is devastating on her family. “We are educated and just want any kind of job to survive.”  They have three children, daughters 11 and 9 and an 8-year-old son.
 
Both these families are a snapshot of new immigrants who now account for one in 10 people using food banks in Canada along with a similar number of aboriginals. While the March 2013 figures for people using food banks show a drop of 4.5 per cent from 2012, it fails to become a good news story as use remains 23 per cent higher than in 2008, before the recession began.
 
With far too many Canadians, new and old, struggling to put food on the table despite the apparent economic recovery, hunger has been called the epicenter of the country’s most pressing issues and flagged by the UN as unacceptable. The HungerCount 2013 report released on Tuesday by Food Banks Canada is the latest to highlight the scourge.
 
“The report comes as no surprise to me as the labour market, especially for new immigrants has become very tight and they have to depend on precarious jobs for mere survival,” said Dr. Usha George, Professor and Dean, Faculty of Community Services at Ryerson University in Toronto.
 
New immigrants are also more vulnerable to the vagaries of the job market as they tend to congregate on cities like Toronto that are becoming increasingly expensive, Dr. George said. “The gap between income and expenses is tremendous and it is growing.”
 
Sensitive economic indicator
A 2013 profile of hunger in the GTA put out by the Daily Bread Food Bank said visits to food banks might be a more sensitive indicator than unemployment rates of how the economy is doing. For most months following April 2012, Daily Bread member agencies saw a reduction in client visits from over the previous year. It preceded a downward trend in unemployment rates in Toronto that began in the fourth quarter of 2012.
 
Food-bank statistics have become a key indicator of poverty in Canada as national figures do not exist for social assistance rates, the number of people whose jobless benefits end before they find work or the waiting list for affordable housing.
 
While people accessing food banks across the GTA are reflective of Toronto’s diversity, there are indications of who might be more affected by poverty. Compared to five years ago, the clients are getting older, more highly educated, and more likely to be born outside of Canada.
 
The Daily Bread Food Bank profile says newcomers who have been in the country for five years or less represent twice the proportion than the general GTA population. This difference is even larger in the inner suburbs where close to 40 per cent of the newcomer population coming to food banks have been in the country for five years or less. Those numbers include highly educated, but underemployed, newcomer families with children living in apartments that are barely affordable.
 
“The people who utilize our services would challenge any typical notion of a food bank client you may have. We have medical doctors, lawyers, doctorates coming to us because of the systemic discrimination they face in the employment market,” said Daven Seebarran, Executive Director of Sikhs Serving Canada, a charity that runs the Seva Food Bank in the Mississauga region of the GTA.  
 
Culturally appropriate
Anecdotal evidences about increasing numbers of newcomers using food banks are many. “The numbers seem to have doubled over the years,” said Qamer Phirzada, the food bank manager of the Muslim Welfare Centre in Toronto’s Scarborough area. While her centre mainly caters to Muslims seeking Halal food, people from other cultures too use its services. “We try our best to put our clients at ease about their predicament,” said Ms. Phirzada.
 
Most food banks in the GTA are increasingly trying to make sure that they serve culturally appropriate food to their client. “One of the main tenets we focus on is to provide culture-appropriate food. This stems from research that says food from the home culture is essential for newcomers at a time of great stress,” said Mr. Seebarran. “We try to accommodate our clients’ needs and make their experience at the food bank as pleasant as possible.  We are dealing with a racialized populace that needs to be handled with sensitivity to make the whole exercise of giving meaningful.”
 
Like the Muslim Welfare Centre, Seva too serves a varied clientele and has seen an increase in the number of new immigrants using its services. “We are expanding to Malton area of Mississauga which again is a racialized community with the highest rate of unemployment in the region and the lowest rate of household income. Our new branch is really, really essential for the community,” said Mr. Seebarran.
 
Ryerson’s Dr. George said new immigrants are finding the going tough because working is no longer a safeguard against poverty due to lack of full-time jobs and the trend towards more part-time or seasonal job opportunities. The survey report on hunger in the GTA indicated that 35 per cent of food bank clients who have been on welfare have cycled on and of it two or more times, illustrating employment precariousness. One respondent to the survey said, “I am not the kind of person to go out and ask people or neighbours for food, money, or help. Without it (food banks), I often would not eat.”
 
Need to focus on root causes
However, food banks may be compounding the very problems they seem to be solving, according to Nick Saul, president and CEO of Community Food Centres Canada. In an article in The Walrus , Mr. Saul says food banks, “with all of their collecting and sorting and distributing and thanking, are meeting the needs of everyone except the people they were set up to help: the poor and hungry.”
 
“This emergency handout approach divides us as citizens, breaking down our society into us and them, givers and takers... We need to stop cheering on an approach that has already failed, and instead focus on the root of the problem: people are hungry because they are poor.”
 
A concern that was shared by Olivier De Schutter, the UN Special Rapporteur on the right to food, during his contentious visit to the country last year. Calling for a national food strategy, the UN official said a large number of Canadians are too poor to afford adequate diets, “800,000 households are food insecure... This is a country that is rich, but that fails to adapt the levels of social assistance benefits and its minimum wage to the rising costs of basic necessities, including food and housing. Food banks that depend on charity are not a solution: they are a symptom of failing social safety nets that the Government must address."
 
Another recent report by researchers at the University of Toronto  said 3.9 million Canadians struggled to afford enough food in 2011, an increase of close to half a million compared with 2008. Of those that went hungry, 1.1 million were children.
 
“The impact of this situation on children, families, communities, the health care system and our economy cannot be overstated,” said Dr. Valerie Tarasuk, a nutritional sciences professor at U of T’s Faculty of Medicine and principal investigator for PROOF, an international team of researchers committed to the reduction of household food insecurity.
 
“The problem is not under control and more effective responses are urgently needed," Tarasuk said. "The cost of inaction is simply too high.” – New Canadian Media
 
Maria, Ali and Sabrina mentioned in the article are fictional profiles based on composite statistics from real client stories from the Daily Bread Food Bank’s 2013 report on hunger in the GTA
 
{module NCM Blurb}
Published in Top Stories

New Canadian Media provides nonpartisan news and views representing all Canadian immigrant communities. As part of this endeavour, we re-publish aggregated content from various ethnic media publishers in Canada in an effort to raise the profile of news and commentary from an immigrant perspective. New Canadian Media, however, does not guarantee the accuracy of or endorse the views and opinions contained in content from such other sites. The views expressed on this site are those of the individual writers and commentators, and not necessarily those of New Canadian Media. Copyright © 2019 All rights reserved