Commentary by Winnie Hwo in Vancouver 

The much-anticipated first federal budget from the new Liberal government was unveiled on March 22. To describe the general reactions, they would be “Wow,” “Oh,” and maybe even, “Oh no.” 

I was all “Yay!” and this is why. 

I am a Chinese-Canadian mother with a university-aged child. I also work for one of the most respected environmental organizations in the country, after a long career in journalism. 

For someone with my kind of profile, I tend to want my country to be cleaner, greener and friendlier. I want this because it is good for my health, my child’s health, our lives and his future. 

For a decade, people like me were frozen out of the federal government’s national policy equation because our previous federal government was only interested in pushing fossil fuels. 

The consequences of this are known: our major trading partners like the U.S. and China have spent the last decade developing their clean-tech industry and green infrastructure. We are grossly behind in this very competitive new economy. 

A struggling Canadian economy 

As it turns out, our previous government was also reluctant to invest in our infrastructure, while it continued to take in more immigrants. 

[quote align="center" color="#999999"][W]hile newcomers help our country grow, they also increase demands for housing, transportation and other services.[/quote]

One thing about accepting more immigrants is that while newcomers help our country grow, they also increase demands for housing, transportation and other services. 

We know many new Canadians gained acceptance to our country by paying millions of dollars for investment funds to contribute to the nation’s economy even before they landed. 

One would expect that this money would be invested in areas to strengthen our economy, like in our clean-tech sectors and aging infrastructures. Unfortunately, that was not the case.  

Over a billion of taxpayer dollars were invested in the fossil fuel industry in the form of oil sand subsidies. 

As world oil prices plunge, so does our dollar. Today, Canadians struggle in the low-dollar reality and find ourselves stuck, with little room to juggle. 

While workers in the oil sands industry are losing their jobs fast, those in the manufacturing sectors are only recently seeing their job prospects improve slightly. 

Long overdue attention to First Nations 

The investment in our First Nations communities is also commendable. 

As immigrants, we came to Canada mostly for better job opportunities, clean water, air and food security. 

Unfortunately, these are not always afforded to our Aboriginal Peoples. For those who live on reserves especially, their water supply is often compromised due to irresponsible mining. 

When their only source of water is contaminated, they pay with their health and lives. 

[quote align="center" color="#999999"]The new Liberal budget is important to me because it signifies a new direction or even the dawn of a new era.[/quote]

For generations, our First Nations people have had to see their loved ones, often small children, suffering serious health challenges because their homes were badly built, their water supply was contaminated and hope was always too far to reach. 

The $8.4 billion funding for our First Nations communities is long overdue. 

Welcoming a new era 

The new Liberal budget is important to me because it signifies a new direction or even the dawn of a new era, if you will. 

The vision I keep seeing is a huge ocean liner called Canada changing course in the high seas, making waves and making its passengers feel bumpy, disrupted or even unsettled. 

But if we take a deep breath and think about it, the reason we feel so shell-shocked by this new budget is because a lot of the big-ticket items were not even addressed by the previous government. 

The move to a new and green economy is a reality. Some might even say inevitable. 

It would be wonderful if Canadians were served a gradual change, of course, but the 10 years of relying on oil and closing our ears to the call for help from our First Nations people by the Harper government means our journey from here on will likely feel a little bumpier. 

Yes, we will have to spend a little time to play catch up, but I know Canadians are resilient and hard working. As long as we work together and support each other, I have no doubt we will make the journey.

Winnie Hwo joined David Suzuki Foundation’s Climate Change Team in 2010 after a long and stellar career in journalism. She is passionate about Canada’s multicultural policy and healthy environment.


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Published in Commentary
Friday, 05 June 2015 13:28

Pinoy Cash Flow Gets a Canadian Boost

Filipinos in Canada are expressing concern about Ottawa’s intention to support lower costs for remittance services.

Ed Fast, Minister of International Trade, told a Filipino gathering at the St. Mary’s church in Vancouver that Canada is working on measures to ensure safe, reliable and low-cost services to transfer money to family and friends outside of the country, helping to improve economic conditions abroad.

These transfers, known as remittances, represent a major source of income for millions of people around the world, and support a sustainable path out of poverty for the poorest and most vulnerable, he said.

To help reduce the costs of remittances services, Canada’s Economic Action Plan 2015 will invest $6 million over five years to introduce measures that will help enhance access to low-cost remittance services for Canadians, the minister said.

The Philippines is one of the top destinations for remittances from Canada.

"We will be comparing all the fees that are charged by companies and banks that are doing remittances to make sure that you know where to get the best price in terms of the cost of sending remittances back to the Philippines," Fast said.

Lower Fees Doesn't Mean Better Service

Some kababayans however said that the government may not be totally aware of what it takes to send and receive money in the Philippines, according to Balitang America.

Salve Didcott has been in Canada for 26 years and sends money to her family in the Philippines monthly. She said there's more to sending remittances than just the fees.

[quote align="center" color="#999999"]Those in the money remittance business meantime say fees have actually been going down the past years as more and more money transfer companies enter the market. But they say lower fees don't necessarily guarantee better service.[/quote]

"Some are actually charging more, less exchange; and the other is the charge is less, but the exchange is high. There are too many (factors), as I've said the location, the price, the exchange rate as well," she said.

Those in the money remittance business meantime say fees have actually been going down the past years as more and more money transfer companies enter the market. But they say lower fees don't necessarily guarantee better service.

Canada's Filipino Community Growing

World Bank estimates show Canada's remittance industry is growing with about $24 billion sent in remittances in 2012. The Philippines is in the top three receiving countries of remittances from Canada with $2 billion sent that year.

Meanwhile, another report said more than 40,000 Filipinos became permanent residents of Canada in 2014, making the Philippines the top source country for Canadian immigration last year. 

The Philippines had previously been the top source country in 2012, with China having been the top source country in 2013. Canada also issued nearly 47,000 visitor visas to Filipinos in 2014, a 56 percent increase since 2006. The number of new permanent residents from the Philippines is up from 14,004 in 2004, a near three-fold increase in just one decade.

Many of the Filipino newcomers originally came to Canada under the Live-In Caregiver Program, now simply the Caregiver Program after modifications made last November. The government of Canada’s immigration plan for 2015 states that it aims to convert between 26,000 and 30,000 caregivers to permanent resident status this year. In just a few short decades, Canada’s Filipino community has grown to become one of the country’s largest immigrant demographics. 

The more than 700,000 people of Filipino descent in Canada make up one of the country’s larger diaspora communities, and this number is increasing constantly. Filipino workers in Canada are important to both the Canadian and Philippine economies. 

[quote align="center" color="#999999"]During President Aquino’s historic visit, Canada and the Philippines signed a mutual accountability framework reaffirming the foundations of transparent, effective and sustainable international development cooperation between the two countries.[/quote]

While workers in Canada help to fill important labour shortages, families and friends in the Philippines benefit from remittances sent from Canada. About half of Canada’s Filipino population lives in the Greater Toronto Area (GTA), with Vancouver hosting the second-largest Filipino population in Canada and Winnipeg also home to a large number of Filipinos. 

“Oftentimes, individuals will first come to Canada as temporary workers, leaving spouses and children behind. But many Filipinos have also worked hard to bring their immediate families to Canada. Once permanent residence is achieved, they are then able to reunite with their families in Canada,” said Attorney David Cohen.

Canada’s generous family sponsorship rules allow permanent residents to sponsor not only children and spouses, but parents and grandparents as well. These include the popular Parent and Grandparent Sponsorship Program as well as the new Super Visa Program, which offers long-term visitor visas to qualified applicants. The introduction of these family reunification programs has contributed to the upsurge in new arrivals from the Philippines.

Quick Facts

  • According to World Bank estimates, remittance flows to developing countries reached close to US$440 billion in 2014.
  • Canada ranks among the 10 largest outbound markets in the world, with remittance flows totalling an estimated US$23.1 billion transferred in 2014. It is also one of the top remittance-sending countries on a per capita basis.
  • At the Brisbane Summit in November 2014, the G-20 re-committed to reducing the global average cost of sending remittances to 5 percent of the amount sent.
  • The Philippines is a priority emerging market under Canada’s Global Markets Action Plan and is a country of focus for the Government of Canada’s international development efforts.
  • During President Aquino’s historic visit, Canada and the Philippines signed a mutual accountability framework reaffirming the foundations of transparent, effective and sustainable international development cooperation between the two countries.
  • In 2014, Canada welcomed more than 40,000 permanent residents from the Philippines, making it Canada's top source country for permanent residents last year.

Published in Partnership with The Filipino Post.

Published in The Philippines

by Jacky Habib (@JackyHabib) in Toronto

New Canadians were not left out of Canadas 2015 budget released by the Federal government in late April. The governments focus on newcomers centres on three primary objectives: remove financial barriers to international education accreditation, reduce costs to send money abroad and provide funds to relocate to job markets with more prospects. 

Lowering Costs of Sending Money Abroad

The 2015 budget proposes to provide $6 million over five years to help Canadians access lower-cost remittance services to send money back home. This includes creating a website that will compare service fees by various providers, to help Canadians make informed decisions when sending money.

Monica Boyd, Canada Research Chair in Immigration and Public Policy at the University of Toronto, says this initiative is a feel-good response by the government.

Theyre saying [high remittance fees] are a problem and they care, and will put information on the web, she says. Its to let people know they have choices. Its a nice promise, but we dont know what more theyre going to be doing.

[quote align="center" color="#999999"]Its really important because most of us come here to support a big family so its necessary to send money home.” - Muhammad Razak[/quote]

Muhammad Razak, who sends money a few times every year to family overseas, has the same concern. When he heard that the government would work to lower the cost of remittance services, his first question was: Whats the procedure?

This is something the government has yet to indicate. Razak says, however, that this should be a priority. Its really important because most of us come here to support a big family so its necessary to send money home.

The EAP report states the government will, “work with financial institutions to evaluate possible collaboration opportunities to expand access to lower-cost remittance services.

Funds for Obtaining Credentials

The government also announced plans to make the Foreign Credential Recognition Loans program permanent.

Introduced in 2011, the pilot project provided loans to foreign-trained individuals to help cover the cost of obtaining their credentials in Canada. A total of $9 million was provided over two years to 1,500 recipients across the country, with an average loan amount of $6,000. 

The Economic Action Plan 2015 proposes to put $35 million over five years towards making this a permanent initiative.

[quote align="center" color="#999999"]The impact of providing micro loans to internationally trained professionals is profound.” - Dianne Fehr, Immigrant Access Fund[/quote]

The loans will continue to be provided by community-based organizations like Immigrant Access Fund, a nonprofit in Alberta. Dianne Fehr, the organizations Executive Director says she was thrilled to hear the government is making this program permanent.

The impact of providing micro loans to internationally trained professionals is profound. We knew that [the government] was pretty pleased with this program,” Fehr says.

Immigrant Access Fund received $1.8 million from the government during its pilot program, which initially provided over 300 loans. Fehr explains that the $1.8 million of government funding has since been recycled back into the program 1.5 times as people pay off their loans.

Recipients begin to pay interest as soon as they receive the loan money for up to two years, and then pay 1.5 per cent above the prime rate, a rate set by Immigrant Access Fund. Fehr says the government has been completely hands-off by allowing community organizations to determine participants’ eligibility and interest rates.

Fahad Mughal, who immigrated to Canada in 2011, is one of the organizations loan recipients.

I was looking to upgrade my skills and learned about a business analyst certification program, but there wasnt any government funding for this.

He found out about the Foreign Credential Recognition Loans program and took a $5,000 loan to enroll in the certification program. That program led to his current job as a business analyst with the City of Edmonton.

[quote align="center" color="#999999"]I know immigrants who want to go to Toronto or Vancouver. Ive seen immigrants live in these saturated markets and theyre just doing survival jobs. I didnt move to Canada to do these survival jobs and thats why I moved.” - Fahad Mughal[/quote]

Mughal, who was educated in Pakistan and has a bachelors degree in computer science and a masters degree in business administration, initially immigrated to Brampton. He worked odd jobs for several months before moving to Edmonton.

Since finding professional and steady work, he has convinced five families who planned to live in Ontario, to move to Edmonton instead.

I think thats the main reason why immigrants come to Canada,” Mughal says. They want to have a better life. I know immigrants who want to go to Toronto or Vancouver. Ive seen immigrants live in these saturated markets and theyre just doing survival jobs. I didnt move to Canada to do these survival jobs and thats why I moved.

Funds to Relocate

The government also proposes to allocate $7 million over two years towards programming, which will support youth and immigrants to relocate to areas in Canada where job opportunities exist.

Studies done by Statistics Canada show that immigrants integrate better and faster in cities like Edmonton and Calgary, rather than larger metropolitan cities like Toronto and Montreal.

Boyd says the proposed budget of $7 million to encourage this move is quite low.

Its not a lot of money,” Boyd says. Its simply [the government] saying we are going to focus on things that we think are going to facilitate the life of immigrants in Canada. But theyre not saying much about what exactly theyre doing or how theyre going to do it.

The Minister of Employment and Social Development, Pierre Poilievre, was unavailable for an interview with New Canadian Media before deadline.

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Published in Economy

 

New Democratic Party leader Tom Mulcair, along with Toronto City Councillor Joe Cressy, seen here engaging with residents in Chinatown.

Photo Credit: Joe Cressy via Flickr CC 


 

by Stephen E. White, Inder S. Marwah, Phil Triadafilopoulos

Can political parties court an “ethnic vote”?

Sometimes it seems like politicians assume the support of ethnic minority communities is there for the taking, as long as parties put in the effort to reach out to them with symbolic gestures or concrete policies. Two recent examples of the Conservative government’s efforts to appeal to voters in ethnic minority communities illustrate this.

One is the memorial to the victims of communism, which the federal government plans to build this summer. As Jeffrey Simpson notes in the Globe and Mail, the memorial is intended to appeal to Eastern European immigrants and their descendants: “The Conservatives have worked very hard to attract these voters by other means, and the memorial represents a further tangible demonstration of the party’s efforts.”

[quote align="center" color="#999999"][I]t’s important to keep in mind there is no single “ethnic vote.”[/quote]

Another is the $6 million over five years, earmarked in the recently tabled federal budget to improve services for Canadians who want to send money to individuals (typically family members) in their countries of origin. Immigrant communities appear to be the target of this measure.

How successfully will these efforts garner voter support in ethnic minority communities?

The Myth of the Monolithic “Ethnic Vote”

To begin with, it’s important to keep in mind there is no single “ethnic vote.”

Canada contains a large number of different ethnic minority communities. According to the 2011 National Household Surveywhile the majority of Canadian residents report British Isles or French ethnic origins, seven other ethnic groups each have populations of more than one million:  German, Italian, Chinese, East Indian, Ukrainian, Dutch and Polish.There are many other smaller, but nonetheless sizeable, groups, too.

[quote align="center" color="#999999"][T]he very idea of an “ethnic vote” supposes that members of ethnic minority communities vote on the basis of their ethnic identities.[/quote]

No single strategy can win the votes of all of these different communities’ members. Parties may succeed in appealing to some communities, but not others. 

More significantly, the very idea of an “ethnic vote” supposes that members of ethnic minority communities vote on the basis of their ethnic identities.

There’s no question that ethnic identity often features prominently in people’s lives, but voters might not have that in mind when casting their ballots.

While many people identify as members of ethnic groups, they also have national and provincial identities, religious identities, occupational identities, and so on. When it comes to deciding on whom to vote for, these other identities could be far more important than ethnic identity.

Minority community members also have distinct political views, unrelated to their ethnic identities, to which parties can appeal.

Many members of ethnic minority communities are first- or second- generation Canadians. Perhaps they see political issues somewhat differently than other Canadians because of their (or their parents’) unique experiences, both in their countries of origin and in Canada.

Some evidence, for example, suggests that immigrants from countries in Africa, Asia, and Latin America are more socially conservative than other Canadians.

Not So Different From the Rest of the Canadian Electorate

The question is, do those differences really matter?

Voters support or reject parties and candidates for all sorts of reasons. For example, a difference in views about social issues means little if voters are focused on the economy, taxes or health care.

[quote align="center" color="#999999"]There’s no evidence that ethnic outreach actually works – but the parties believe it might, and this conviction shapes both electoral strategies and policy making.[/quote]

Parties and leaders have some power to shape the election agenda, but not total power.  The Parti Québécois learned this lesson the hard way in the 2014 Quebec election, when its efforts to mobilize voters in defense of secularism were overshadowed by one of its star candidate’s unscripted, and ultimately damaging, statements on sovereignty.

New Canadians are no less savvy than the rest of the Canadian electorate. While it’s true that recent immigrants don’t have many years of experience with Canadian politics and elections, research also suggests they learn rather quickly.

There’s no reason, then, to think that parties’ targeted appeals to ethnic minority communities are any more effective than the strategies used to win the support of other kinds of voters.

Where does this leave us?  We can be sure the “ethnic vote” will figure prominently in political parties’ 2015-election campaigning. While the success of their efforts can in no way be assumed, the parties will undoubtedly compete for the support of new Canadians. 

There’s no evidence that ethnic outreach actually works – but the parties believe it might, and this conviction shapes both electoral strategies and policy making. 

Canadian political parties’ ongoing and ever more systematic efforts to compete for the votes of new Canadians helps explain why anti-immigrant discourse is so rare in Canadian elections and why Canadian parties, regardless of their ideological stripe, support robust immigration levels and the maintenance of an official multiculturalism policy

Put differently, Canadian “exceptionalism” in the area of immigration politics and policy may have less to do with our innate civic virtues than with the strategic calculations of our political operators.


Stephen E. White is a SSHRC Postdoctoral Fellow at Concordia University’s department of political science. Inder S. Marwah is a SSHRC Postdoctoral Fellow at McMaster University’s department of political science.  Phil Triadafilopoulos is associate professor of political science at the University of Toronto Scarborough and the School of Public Policy and Governance.

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Published in Politics

by Abbas Somji (@abbassomji) in Toronto [Part 1 of 3 of an in-depth investigative series.]

For over two decades, Canada has welcomed an average of 250,000 immigrants per year. These newcomers often settle into any one of the countrys major metropolitan centres, chiefly Toronto, Vancouver, Montreal or Calgary.

For countless new immigrants, uprooting their families and rebuilding their lives from scratch in Canada is made easier with the help of settlement agencies. But the future of some government-funded settlement agencies now hangs in limbo including in Ontario, which boasts hundreds of agencies catering to newcomers.

Many of these organizations anxiously await the unveiling of Canadas federal budget on April 21.

Is there going to be another reduction? What is the scale of the reduction?” wonders Moy Wong-Tam, Executive Director of Toronto-based Centre for Immigrant and Community Services (CICS).

Every year, you hold your breath not knowing what to expect for that year,” she says, adding that her organization is falling behind inflation.

[The government says], heres the reduced budget, but you cannot cut the programs and services.’ So what do we cut? Were bare bones. I cant cut the rent. I cant cut the heat or light.

Wong-Tam says the CICS has been open for over 40 years, 25 years of which Citizenship and Immigration Canada (CIC) has funded.

[quote align="center" color="#999999"]I think a lot of the agencies out there have been incredibly hard-hit because theyre so reliant on settlement for all their funding.” - Paulina Wyrzykowski, West Neighbourhood House[/quote]

However, 2012 proved to be a challenging year for the industry, when at least 15 agencies were affected by the cuts to federal funding, though none of those agencies have yet closed. The Ontario Council of Agencies Serving Immigrants (OCASI) says, "The province stepped in, in a big way and supported eight of the organizations with significant funds to continue services and to build their capacity.

"OCASI (with some funding support from the province) along with the United Way of Toronto also provided capacity building support in particular around strategic planning, etc.,” OCASI adds. “One or two [agencies] are barely holding on."

For Wong-Tam, this has resulted in stagnated wages and poor talent retention.

We just feel that maybe its not seen as a priority,” says Wong-Tam.

Its not good morale for the people who work in this sector,” she adds. They work here because theyre not about money, they really want to help newcomers. The majority of our staff are, or have been, a newcomer at one point in their lives.

I think a lot of the agencies out there have been incredibly hard-hit because theyre so reliant on settlement for all their funding,” says Paulina Wyrzykowski, of the family & newcomer program at West Neighbourhood House, a non-profit social service agency in Toronto.

I think that that kind of repeated cuts really lends itself to feeling targeted,” says Wyrzykowski.

The Waiting Game

Wyrzykowski says previous cuts to funding were part of the governments economic vision.

I do think the government is invested in immigration. The overall numbers of immigrants havent gone down. But I do believe theyre hoping to bring in people who will be more self-sufficient earlier,” she says.

According to the Ontario Council of Agencies Serving Immigrants (OCASI), the provincial government funds about 97 agencies across Ontario with approximately $8 million. The federal government invests almost $296 million in over 200 organizations.

Thats the scale, and yet, with that part of money, with the bulk of that money, the agencies can only serve those with permanent residency,” says OCASI Executive Director Debbie Douglas. No students, no migrant workers, no citizens.

The initial cuts were a result of what Wong-Tam calls proportional geographic distribution,” in which tax dollars follow the immigrants. Ontario reportedly lost its lions share of funding to Alberta in 2012 when the government noticed more of a shift in immigration patterns, with more newcomers finding employment opportunities in the oil-rich province.

[quote align="center" color="#999999"]We just feel that we need to have a certain level of stability and not have very drastic changes in a very short time because once youve lost an organization, theyre gone. It takes a while to develop a new organization or for others to pick up the slack.” - Moy Wong-Tam, Centre for Immigrant and Community Services[/quote]

Since then, theres been a boomerang effect, and a spike in secondary migration, with more newcomers feeling isolated in Western Canada and moving to Ontario because of the provinces diverse communities.

Now that Alberta may be losing its glow, we dont know what will happen with the flow of immigration,” says Wong-Tam. We just feel that we need to have a certain level of stability and not have very drastic changes in a very short time because once youve lost an organization, theyre gone. It takes a while to develop a new organization or for others to pick up the slack.

Meanwhile, Wyrzykowski insists there is a clear reason for why the federal government chooses to fund certain groups over others.

All of the changes that Ive seen in the last few years were basically designed to make sure that the people who get into Canada are ones that will contribute economically immediately, and in the governments mind – require minimal settlement support,” she says.

Lofty Goals

In 2014, the federal government unveiled the International Education Strategy, outlining an ambitious goal of nearly doubling the number of international researchers and students it attracts at the post-secondary level.

The strategy aims to have at least 450,000 international students by the year 2022 – up from just over 239,000. The initiative is an effort to create jobs and stimulate the domestic economy.

[quote align="center" color="#999999"]What we found was upwards of 30 per cent of international students didnt even know there was such a thing as settlement services, which was a real concern for us. [It] means the sector isnt doing a good job in terms of promoting it, but then you understand why promote it if the bulk of the services is not eligible for those students?” - Debbie Douglas, Ontario Council of Agencies Serving Immigrants[/quote]

Wong-Tam argues Canada has a moral obligation” to help the influx of students who will be coming to the country, even though her own organization technically cannot.

We were funded to help immigrants, but we were not funded to help international students,” she says. But its very plain to us the needs are there.

She says the organization is seeing a steady rise in the number of students from China, India and South Korea coming to Canada – many of whom are intent on acquiring permanent residency status after completing their studies.

Wong-Tam insists they make ideal candidates as they have invested the time and money to learn about the country and the language and have integrated into Canadian society from their time spent here during their studies.

Douglas says a 2012 OCASI research project, titled Making Ontario Home, revealed how little newcomers knew about support services available to them.

What we found was upwards of 30 per cent of international students didnt even know there was such a thing as settlement services, which was a real concern for us,” says Douglas.

[It] means the sector isnt doing a good job in terms of promoting it, but then you understand why promote it if the bulk of the services is not eligible for those students?

Wong-Tam says international students need settlement agencies to inform them of things such as safety issues and fraud prevention as depriving them of that exposure could potentially compromise Canadas reputation overseas. Recent tragedies involving foreign students from East Asia, including a high-profile murder case of a York University international student, highlight this point.

For now, Wong-Tam has launched a pilot project, working alongside universities and colleges to host basic orientation sessions, to inform foreign students of what they need to know in order to thrive in their newly adopted country.

A Roller Coaster Ride

For the past three years, it seems every week theres a new policy,” says Wong-Tam, who adds the situation did eventually stabilize in 2014.

Hopefully things will be more stable because its like a roller coaster ride for agencies to keep coping with different changes,” says Wong-Tam, adding that its extra work for settlement staff who must spend more time keeping up with the news.

I think the agencies in Ontario are feeling traumatized,” says Douglas, who adds that shes anticipating further decreases in federal funding in Ontario, B.C. and the Atlantic region.

Were worried about the capacity of the community to sustain the services in the long haul,” says Wong-Tam. If policies change very drastically, then we have to be prepared. You have to give enough time for planning and for implementation… Its not an enviable position to be in.


Editor's Note: An earlier version of this report erroneously reported that, "However, 2012 proved to be a challenging year for the industry, when at least 15 agencies reportedly lost all of their funding and had to shut down. Since then, there have been relentless cuts to the settlement service industry." NCM is happy to provide more context and thus have a more informed discussion around these cuts. We regret the mistaken impression that the earlier report may have left with our readers.

In the next 360° installment, we turn our focus to the Atlantic region – a part of Canada that has historically struggled to attract and retain newcomers due to a lack of employment opportunities.

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Published in Top Stories

New Canadian Media provides nonpartisan news and views representing all Canadian immigrant communities. As part of this endeavour, we re-publish aggregated content from various ethnic media publishers in Canada in an effort to raise the profile of news and commentary from an immigrant perspective. New Canadian Media, however, does not guarantee the accuracy of or endorse the views and opinions contained in content from such other sites. The views expressed on this site are those of the individual writers and commentators, and not necessarily those of New Canadian Media. Copyright © 2019 All rights reserved