The Philippines

Canada has announced an additional P128 million (C$3>58 million) of security assistance to the Philippines to further support the Bangsamoro peace process and address regional and global security threats.

Canada will deploy additional Canadian police officers to chair the Independent Commission on Policing for the Bangsamoro to provide strategic advice on the development of policing options for the Bangsamoro under the National Police.

This was made following its deployment of Randy Beck, former assistant commissioner of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police.

[quote align="center" color="#999999"]“These police support projects will further strengthen relations and connections between Canadian and Filipino law authorities facilitating cooperation and information sharing on transnational organized crime, which is expected to improve safety conditions in Canada and the Philippines.” - Canadian Ambassador to the Philippines Neil Reeder[/quote]

Canada will also provide training to Filipino police officers to address transnational organized crime, including major case management, evidence handling and interview techniques.

These projects, valued at P54 million, are funded by Canada’s Department of Foreign Affairs’ Trade and Development’s Anti-Crime Capacity-Building Program and Global Peace and Security Fund.

“These police support projects will further strengthen relations and connections between Canadian and Filipino law authorities facilitating cooperation and information sharing on transnational organized crime, which is expected to improve safety conditions in Canada and the Philippines,” Canadian Ambassador to the Philippines Neil Reeder said.

“This additional commitment from the Canadian government was announced during the meeting between Prime Minister Stephen Harper and President Aquino held in Ottawa last month, and we are committed to working with trusted allies and partners to address international security issues,” he added.

Future Initiatives 

Two other security-related projects were announced during President Aquino’s state visit to Canada.

Announced were the capacity-building for port and maritime security in the Philippines project worth P41 million and the counter-improvised explosives devices training that will cost P33 million.

[quote align="center" color="#999999"]Canada will work with Filipino officials to build tactical and operational relationships.[/quote]

Funded by the Canadian government’s Counter-Terrorism Capacity Building Program, the three-year project to be implemented by the International Police Organization (Interpol), is part of an ongoing effort to address the threats of piracy, terrorism and organized crime to maritime security in Southeast Asia.

The project will seek to enhance front-line law-enforcement institutional capacity by strengthening the ability of the Philippines to gather, collect, analyze and share essential law-enforcement data. This will help ensure that the Philippines can provide more information to Interpol’s database, thus benefiting other countries in their efforts to counter terrorism worldwide.

The three-year counter-improvised explosive devices training, led by Canada’s Department of National Defence (DND) with the Canadian Armed Forces’ Joint Counter Explosive Threat Task Force as implementing partner, looks to increase Counter-Improvised Explosive Devices (C-IED) institutionalization in the Philippines and increase the survivability of C-IED first responders.

As part of this project, Canada will work with Filipino officials to build tactical and operational relationships. DND will undertake subject matter expert exchanges and exercises to assess current C-IED capabilities with a view to developing detailed project plans. Canada will also provide training sessions focused on building individual technical skills, as well as training a cadre of trainers so that C-IED programs remain sustainable.

Published in Partnership with The Filipino Post.

by Florence Hwang

Canadian families looking for caregivers or nannies will have a harder time, thanks to the federal legislation that is capping overseas applications, according to Migrante BC.

Between December 2014 and March 2015, the federal government only approved 92 of the 880 applications for the Labour Market Impact Assessment (LMIA) (which an employer needs to obtain before hiring overseas caregivers).

“We say it looks like this because only three per cent of applications for overseas caregivers were approved by the federal government recently,” says Hessed Torres, who came under the Live-in Caregiver Program.

“For caregivers like me who are already here, this is a big problem because it means I might not be able to complete the 24 months of caregiving work needed for me to qualify as a permanent resident applicant,” says Torres, who is also a Migrante BC member.

[quote align="center" color="#999999"]“Caregivers are treated as fairly as any other workers who require work experience in Canada before applying for permanent residency. In fact, Caregivers are the only workers who have direct path to permanent immigration.” - Bruce Hicks, Citizenship and Immigration Canada[/quote]

Migrant Workers Alliance for Change estimates about 70,000 workers had to leave Canada as of April 1, 2015. Workers who have been employed for four years cannot apply for another work permit for another four years, nor can they re-enter Canada for that time frame.

Torres notes that if the time (about four to six months) it takes to process applications is factored in, it might mean people applying for the program could run out of time to qualify for the program and be forced to return to their home country.

'Revolving Door Immigration System'

The four-in-four-out rule is the government’s entrenchment of a “revolving door immigration system,” says Syed Hussan, Coordinator of the Migrant Workers Alliance for Change.

“A well-trained workforce will be replaced by people who are new, and less aware of their rights. The real solution is permanent residency on arrival, now,” says Hussan in an interview with The Philippine Reporter.

In response to the extraordinarily high rejection rate of Filipino nannies, the Citizenship and Immigration Canada (CIC) media spokesperson Bruce Hicks stated that this year CIC will aggressively be attacking the backlog of applicants. Hicks said CIC will be admitting 30,000 caregivers (and their spouses and dependents) as permanent residents by the end of 2016.

[quote align="center" color="#999999"]“The massive red tape to hire foreign caregivers hurts parents and families in need of elderly and disabled care. Furthermore it puts caregivers already in Canada in difficult positions as they are not allowed to legally work until they receive their work permit and it can take six to seven months at the moment. In reality, who can afford not to work for six to seven months?” -Manuela Gruber Hersch, International Nannies & Homecare Ltd.[/quote]

Furthermore, the government says in 2014, there was a record set of 17,500 permanent resident admission levels for caregivers.

“Caregivers are treated as fairly as any other workers who require work experience in Canada before applying for permanent residency. In fact, Caregivers are the only workers who have direct path to permanent immigration,” says Hicks.

Manuela Gruber Hersch, General Manager and Regulated Immigration Consultant of International Nannies & Homecare Ltd. points out that the government's Permanent Residency backlog should be seen as a separate process from people receiving a LMIA.

“The PR backlog of caregivers was created by this Government and based on the CIC website, processing is now up to 45 months,” she says.
She wants to know how the government " aggressively" attacking the backlog? She notes that many 2010 applicants are still waiting for their PR and the medical of their family members in the Philippines has expired.

“There is a shortage of qualified Canadians who have solid childcare experience and references and the massive red tape to hire foreign caregivers hurts parents and families in need of elderly and disabled care. Furthermore it puts caregivers already in Canada in difficult positions as they are not allowed to legally work until they receive their work permit and it can take six to seven months at the moment. In reality, who can afford not to work for six to seven months?” says Gruber Hersch.

New guidelines for caregivers looking after children and seniors include:

  • Having two years of full-time work experience in Canada as a care provider within the past four years
  • Having at least one year of a Canadian post-secondary education credential or equivalent foreign credential
  • Having a minimum language requirement of ‘initial intermediate’ by meeting the Canadian Language Benchmark 5 in a designated third-party language test

Published in Partnership with The Filipino Post.

Friday, 05 June 2015 13:28

Pinoy Cash Flow Gets a Canadian Boost

Written by

Filipinos in Canada are expressing concern about Ottawa’s intention to support lower costs for remittance services.

Ed Fast, Minister of International Trade, told a Filipino gathering at the St. Mary’s church in Vancouver that Canada is working on measures to ensure safe, reliable and low-cost services to transfer money to family and friends outside of the country, helping to improve economic conditions abroad.

These transfers, known as remittances, represent a major source of income for millions of people around the world, and support a sustainable path out of poverty for the poorest and most vulnerable, he said.

To help reduce the costs of remittances services, Canada’s Economic Action Plan 2015 will invest $6 million over five years to introduce measures that will help enhance access to low-cost remittance services for Canadians, the minister said.

The Philippines is one of the top destinations for remittances from Canada.

"We will be comparing all the fees that are charged by companies and banks that are doing remittances to make sure that you know where to get the best price in terms of the cost of sending remittances back to the Philippines," Fast said.

Lower Fees Doesn't Mean Better Service

Some kababayans however said that the government may not be totally aware of what it takes to send and receive money in the Philippines, according to Balitang America.

Salve Didcott has been in Canada for 26 years and sends money to her family in the Philippines monthly. She said there's more to sending remittances than just the fees.

[quote align="center" color="#999999"]Those in the money remittance business meantime say fees have actually been going down the past years as more and more money transfer companies enter the market. But they say lower fees don't necessarily guarantee better service.[/quote]

"Some are actually charging more, less exchange; and the other is the charge is less, but the exchange is high. There are too many (factors), as I've said the location, the price, the exchange rate as well," she said.

Those in the money remittance business meantime say fees have actually been going down the past years as more and more money transfer companies enter the market. But they say lower fees don't necessarily guarantee better service.

Canada's Filipino Community Growing

World Bank estimates show Canada's remittance industry is growing with about $24 billion sent in remittances in 2012. The Philippines is in the top three receiving countries of remittances from Canada with $2 billion sent that year.

Meanwhile, another report said more than 40,000 Filipinos became permanent residents of Canada in 2014, making the Philippines the top source country for Canadian immigration last year. 

The Philippines had previously been the top source country in 2012, with China having been the top source country in 2013. Canada also issued nearly 47,000 visitor visas to Filipinos in 2014, a 56 percent increase since 2006. The number of new permanent residents from the Philippines is up from 14,004 in 2004, a near three-fold increase in just one decade.

Many of the Filipino newcomers originally came to Canada under the Live-In Caregiver Program, now simply the Caregiver Program after modifications made last November. The government of Canada’s immigration plan for 2015 states that it aims to convert between 26,000 and 30,000 caregivers to permanent resident status this year. In just a few short decades, Canada’s Filipino community has grown to become one of the country’s largest immigrant demographics. 

The more than 700,000 people of Filipino descent in Canada make up one of the country’s larger diaspora communities, and this number is increasing constantly. Filipino workers in Canada are important to both the Canadian and Philippine economies. 

[quote align="center" color="#999999"]During President Aquino’s historic visit, Canada and the Philippines signed a mutual accountability framework reaffirming the foundations of transparent, effective and sustainable international development cooperation between the two countries.[/quote]

While workers in Canada help to fill important labour shortages, families and friends in the Philippines benefit from remittances sent from Canada. About half of Canada’s Filipino population lives in the Greater Toronto Area (GTA), with Vancouver hosting the second-largest Filipino population in Canada and Winnipeg also home to a large number of Filipinos. 

“Oftentimes, individuals will first come to Canada as temporary workers, leaving spouses and children behind. But many Filipinos have also worked hard to bring their immediate families to Canada. Once permanent residence is achieved, they are then able to reunite with their families in Canada,” said Attorney David Cohen.

Canada’s generous family sponsorship rules allow permanent residents to sponsor not only children and spouses, but parents and grandparents as well. These include the popular Parent and Grandparent Sponsorship Program as well as the new Super Visa Program, which offers long-term visitor visas to qualified applicants. The introduction of these family reunification programs has contributed to the upsurge in new arrivals from the Philippines.

Quick Facts

  • According to World Bank estimates, remittance flows to developing countries reached close to US$440 billion in 2014.
  • Canada ranks among the 10 largest outbound markets in the world, with remittance flows totalling an estimated US$23.1 billion transferred in 2014. It is also one of the top remittance-sending countries on a per capita basis.
  • At the Brisbane Summit in November 2014, the G-20 re-committed to reducing the global average cost of sending remittances to 5 percent of the amount sent.
  • The Philippines is a priority emerging market under Canada’s Global Markets Action Plan and is a country of focus for the Government of Canada’s international development efforts.
  • During President Aquino’s historic visit, Canada and the Philippines signed a mutual accountability framework reaffirming the foundations of transparent, effective and sustainable international development cooperation between the two countries.
  • In 2014, Canada welcomed more than 40,000 permanent residents from the Philippines, making it Canada's top source country for permanent residents last year.

Published in Partnership with The Filipino Post.

by Ted Alcuitas (@Ted_Alcuitas) in Vancouver

With Philippine President Benigno Aquino’s recent visit to Canada, the Philippines have been more widely reported on in mainstream media. Still, many of the diaspora’s stories and news go widely uncovered by major news networks. Aquino, himself, was covered quite differently by Philippine outlets than in the mainstream. In this edition of PULSE, find out about what’s been making waves in the Philippine media.

Aquino’s Visit to Canada: Not All Positive

The recent visit of Philippine President Aquino generated its fair share of coverage from the mainstream media – generally concentrating on the ‘positive’ side of the visit, trade talks, etc., while treating protesters with muted interest.

But Filipino outlets covered the negative aspects as well; in fact, even before he arrived.

Bern Jagunos (pictured to the right), a writer for the Toronto-based Philippine Reporter, wrote on May 1 that it appears Canadian Prime Minister Stephen Harper has not heard that the President’s aura has “irreversibly dimmed,” thanks to what she called Aquino’s, “atrocious human rights record, dismally inept leadership and the unbridled corruption of his administration.”

President Aquino’s popularity back home has sunk to a record low, Jagunos claimed.

Jagunos also referred to a study by Global Witness that quotes the International Coalition on Human Rights in the Philippines (ICHRP) saying that, “under President Aquino’s leadership, the Philippines ranks third among the most dangerous countries in the world for citizens who advocate for the protection of the environment. In 2014 alone, 15 Filipinos were killed by state agents because the Aquino government considered their opposition to large scale mining and other destructive resource extraction projects a threat to the state.”

Meanwhile, after he arrived in Canada, ethnic media continued to provide critical commentary of his visit.

The Philippine Reporter called Toronto’s event at Roy Thomson Hall welcoming Aquino to town, a “political rally”, inside its article published in partnership with New Canadian Media. Most of the invited guests cheered Aquino and Harper on, the article stated, but many others were upset the more difficult issues of rights abuse, poverty and temporary foreign workers were not raised.

On the other hand Vancouver’s Philippine Canadian Inquirer reported that Aquino had a “rousing welcome” from the Fil-Can community, but failed to mention the protests outside.

Filipinos Want to Stop Deportations

According to the Pilipino Express, activists from across Canada stepped up their fight efforts to stop the deportations of thousands of temporary foreign workers caught in the federal government’s “4-in-4-out” rule that came into effect April 1.

Migrant workers who have been in Canada for four years will be barred from returning to Canada under the same program for another four years.

It is estimated that as many as 70,000 workers will be forced to leave, according to the Migrant Workers Alliance for Change.

[quote align="center" color="#999999"]“It’s appropriate to sympathize with individual temporary foreign workers, because, quite simply, they’ve done nothing wrong.” - Gil McGowan, head of Alberta Federation of Labour[/quote]

Workers in managerial and professional occupations, or under international agreements such as NAFTA, and those who have already received approval letters for their permanent residence applications, are exempt.

Critics have condemned the April 1 implementation as an April Fool’s joke for the thousands who expected to be deported.

Veteran immigration consultant Michael Scott, writing for the Pilipino Express in Winnipeg, praised Gil McGowan — the head of the Alberta Federation of Labour — and quotes him speaking about the basic compassion held by Canadians: “It’s appropriate to sympathize with individual temporary foreign workers, because, quite simply, they’ve done nothing wrong,” McGowan said.

McGowan pointed out that the expansion and abuse of the Temporary Foreign Worker Program (TFWP) is a result of the Harper government’s approach to the shortage of skilled workers inside Canada.

He added that the Conservatives created a “two-tier labour market in which unscrupulous employers are allowed to use a vulnerable underclass of workers to drive down wages, displace Canadians and avoid their responsibilities related to training.”

International Outcry Wins Reprieve for Mary Jane Veloso

Canada was caught in the international outcry surrounding Indonesia’s aborted execution of Mary Jane Veloso, who a firing squad was scheduled to execute on April 28. 

The mother of two won a reprieve from the Indonesian government after Philippine President Aquino reportedly broke protocol by speaking directly to the Indonesian Foreign Minister on the sidelines of an Asian-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) meeting.

The migrant’s rights group Migrante Canada, which has organizations in Ontario, Manitoba, Alberta and B.C., spearheaded the Canadian effort to lobby for Veloso’s release, alongside organizations like Migrante International, the International Migrants Alliance (IMA), Bayan Canada and the International League of Peoples’ Struggle (ILPS).

According to the Philippine Asian Chronicle, members of Migrante B.C. (pictured above) rallied outside the Indonesian consulate in Vancouver on April 24.

[quote align="center" color="#999999"][Migrante B.C.] held Aquino’s government accountable for Veloso’s near-execution and criticized him for his continued inaction towards other cases involving Filipinos on death row abroad.[/quote]

In a press release, Migrante B.C. coordinator Jane Ordinario said that although Veloso had already been transferred to ‘Execution Island,’ the group would not give up hope, adding that many individuals and organizations were calling on Indonesian President Joko Widodo to grant her clemency.

The group held Aquino’s government accountable for Veloso’s near-execution and criticized him for his continued inaction towards other cases involving Filipinos on death row abroad. 

Ordinario added that the group had met with the Philippine Consul General, Neil Ferrer, to submit its demands.

Migrante held a noon vigil on April 28 in front of the Indonesian consulate followed by a community prayer at the Multicultural Helping House Society to celebrate that Veloso’s execution had been cancelled.

Michael Davantes Voted Most Beautiful Filipino-Canadian

Mabuhay Montreal TV (MMTV) anchor, Michael Davantes, has been named the ‘Most Beautiful Filipino-Canadian’ in Canada.

The Montreal-based North American Filipino Star’s Fely Rosales Carino writes, “The word beautiful can be defined in many different ways. It commonly describes those with physical attributes; however, it can also describe someone who has demonstrated an extraordinary achievement or success.”

The International Professional Entertainment Network chose Davantes, because as Carino reports, the network honours those who have made an “impact in the community, or even in somebody else’s life.” The Network has made it clear that it believes Davantes to be a beautiful person inside and out.

The fifth annual Most Beautiful Filipinos in Canada Awards ceremony was held in Toronto on January 31, 2015. There, Davantes received an award of recognition.

In the past, the anchor has been a recipient of Vanier College’s “Life Award” for scholastic achievement and tremendous community service. He has also held the “Outstanding Graduate of the Year” title by the Philippine Benevolent and the Scholarship Society of Quebec (PBSSQ) and been recognized as one of the “Most Outstanding Filipino-Canadians” by the Bb. Pilipinas World Pageant for helping build a positive image for Filipinos in Canada.

Calling him “dynamic” Carino’s article also lists all of Davantes’ many talents as he has worked as a medical lab technician, model trainer and agent, international pageant director, public relations and marketing consultant, musical theatre actor and an environmental columnist in the past.

Manila: A Dangerous Place for Lawyers

Just as Philippine President Aquino left Canada last week, The Law Society of Upper Canada said it is deeply concerned about the ongoing human rights violations faced by lawyers and judges in the Philippines, reported the Filipino Post.

The Post article speaks to an incident last summer when an unidentified motorcycle gunmen killed lawyer Rodolfo Felicio (pictured to the left) on August 24, making him the fifth member of the Filipino activist group, National Union of People’s Lawyers, to have been killed in the past 10 years.

Reports indicate that at least 41 lawyers and 18 judges have been murdered in the Philippines since 2001. An increasing number of lawyers and judges have been harassed and attacked.

The Law Society urged the government of the Philippines to put an end to all acts of violence and harassment against human rights lawyer and defenders in the nation, and guarantee in all circumstances the physical and psychological safety and integrity of all human rights lawyers and defenders, according to the article.

According to the Basic Report on the Human Rights Lawyers under Continuing Threat in the Philippines, in these cases “only very scarcely a perpetrator is arrested and nearly never prosecuted or punished by the courts.”

The Post makes note that in its World Report 2015 Human Rights Watch stated that Aquino continues to send “mixed signals” about his administration’s commitment to improving human rights in the Philippines.

“While human rights was a key agenda for Aquino when he took office in 2010, he has failed to make good on many of his commitments, chiefly his expressed intent to end killings of activists and journalists and bring those responsible to justice,” stated the report.

Photos sourced from the original stories that were summarized from ethnic media outlets cited.


Ted Alcuitas is former senior editor of the Philippine Asian News Today and currently publisher and editor of philippinecanadiannews.com.

{module NCM Blurb}

Thursday, 30 April 2015 20:24

Trash Talk Stops as Aquino Comes to Canada

Written by

With Philippine President Benigno Aquino set to make a state visit to Canada next month, the Department of Environment and Natural Resources (DENR) in Manila has dropped its demand on the Canadian government to take back the trash that was illegally shipped there two years ago.

Philippine Environment Secretary Ramon Paje said the inter-agency government committee, including the DENR, agreed to dispose of the trash in landfills here “for the sake of our diplomatic relations” with Canada.

“It has been resolved. The DFA (Department of Foreign Affairs) has strongly recommended it be settled diplomatically,” Paje said in an interview, published in Manila.

[quote align="center" color="#999999"]The Bureau of Customs (BoC) said 50 container vans loaded with trash arrived in six batches from June to August 2013 at the Manila port.[/quote]

“We still hold that the best thing to be done is that they (Canada) take it back, but what will be the effect? It will affect our diplomatic relations,” he went on.

The Bureau of Customs (BoC) said 50 container vans loaded with trash arrived in six batches from June to August 2013 at the Manila port.

The shipment was passed off as scrap materials for recycling, but customs inspectors discovered it consisted of household waste including adult diapers.

The DENR originally asked the Canadian government to take back the trash, as provided under the Basel Convention on the Control of Transboundary Movements of Hazardous Wastes.

[quote align="center" color="#999999"]The trash had been rotting in the past two years, posing a health hazard at the Manila port and Subic port where some of the container vans were transferred to ease congestion.[/quote]

The Philippines and Canada are among the 180 signatories to the treaty that seeks to prevent developed nations from dumping trash in developing nations.

Paje claimed the trash consisted of “recyclable plastics.” “Therefore if there is nothing hazardous, it can be treated here,” he said.

The trash had been rotting in the past two years, posing a health hazard at the Manila port and Subic port where some of the container vans were transferred to ease congestion.

According to Paje, they are still waiting for clearance from the Manila Regional Trial Court, after government prosecutors last February asked that the trash be disposed of in local landfills while the case continued.

No Need to Hurt Diplomatic Relations

The Canadian Embassy in Manila has been on receiving end of mass actions and public petitions to take back the trash since the illegal shipment was discovered.

The embassy has refused to take back the garbage, saying the issue was a “private commercial matter” between a Canadian exporter and its Philippine importer-partner.

“The issue is as friendly countries, would you insist on hurting diplomatic relations if there is another way?,” Paje said.

[quote align="center" color="#999999"]Canada will also look into their policies to avoid a repeat. They will go after their exporter.” - Ramon Paje, Philippine Environment Secretary[/quote]

“They promised they will prevent a repeat. Canada will also look into their policies to avoid a repeat. They will go after their exporter,” he said. 

President Aquino will undertake a state visit to Canada on May 7 to 9, followed by a one-day working visit to the United States.

Malacañang said he would witness the signing of bilateral agreements on labor cooperation, development assistance and infrastructure development. SFM

Canada is the Philippines’ 21st largest trading partner, its sixth top source market for tourism, and is home to almost 700,000 Filipinos.

In 2014, Canada announced that the Philippines had been designated a Country of Focus for development assistance, and a Priority Emerging Market for Canadian overseas trade and investment.

The two leaders are expected to witness the signing of bilateral agreements on labor cooperation, development assistance, and infrastructure development, which will highlight the vibrancy of people-to-people relations.

The visit is the first state visit of a Philippine president to Canada since the visit of former President Fidel Ramos in 1997.


Re-published in partnership with Asian Pacific Post.

Sunday, 26 April 2015 13:50

Remittance 'Mega-Flows' to Asia

Written by

Remittances to the Philippines reached $28 billion US in 2014, making the country the third largest remittance recipient in the world, a report from the World Bank (WB) showed.

The country is preceded only by India, which received remittances of $70 billion, and China, $64 billion. Mexico and Nigeria followed the Philippines, having received $25 billion and $21 billion, respectively.

Total remittances in 2014 reached $583 billion, representing a 4.7 per cent growth from 2013.

[quote align="center" color="#999999"]With new thinking, these mega-flows can be leveraged to finance development and infrastructure projects.” - Kaushik Basu, World Bank[/quote]

“This (total remittances) is more than double the ODA (official development assistance) in the world… With new thinking, these mega-flows can be leveraged to finance development and infrastructure projects,” said the bank’s chief economist and senior vice president Kaushik Basu.

For this year, global remittances are projected to grow by 0.4 per cent, the slowest growth rate since the global financial crisis in 2008.

In 2015, total remittances are expected to reach $586 billion.

[quote align="center" color="#999999"]The United States, Saudi Arabia, the United Arab Emirates, United Kingdom, Singapore, Japan, Hong Kong and Canada are the top countries where Filipinos work or migrate.[/quote]

“The slowdown in the growth of remittances this year will affect most developing countries…The positive impact of an economic recovery in the U.S. will be partially offset by continued weakness in the Euro area, the impact of lower oil prices on the Russian economy, the strengthening of the US dollar, and tighter immigration controls in many remittance source countries,” the report said.

Slowdown Seen in 2015

For East Asia and the Pacific, the World Bank said the growth will also be slower. From an estimated 7.6 per cent growth in 2014, growth this year is seen to hit 2.8 per cent.

Citing data from the Philippine Overseas Employment Administration, the BSP said 1.6 million Filipinos were deployed last year, while job orders increased by 10.7 per cent to 878,609.

The United States, Saudi Arabia, the United Arab Emirates, United Kingdom, Singapore, Japan, Hong Kong and Canada are the top countries where Filipinos work or migrate.


Published in partnership with Asian Pacific Post.

 

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